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ANTI-AGING EFFECTS OF CREATINE SUPPLEMENTATION

Anti-aging affects of creatine supplementation

Creatine monohydrate is a supplement that is commonly used by athletes and bodybuilders to improve muscle strength and size. However, recent studies have shown that it may have anti-aging effects on our bodies, particularly on lipofuscin accumulation and sarcopenia.

Lipofuscin is a pigment that accumulates in our cells over time and is associated with cellular aging and dysfunction. It is particularly prevalent in the heart, liver, and muscles. Studies have shown that creatine supplementation can reduce lipofuscin accumulation in muscle cells, which may help prevent age-related muscle dysfunction.

In a study published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, researchers investigated the effect of creatine supplementation on muscle function in older adults. The researchers found that creatine supplementation significantly improved muscle function in older adults and reduced the amount of lipofuscin in muscle cells. The researchers concluded that creatine supplementation may be a potential anti-aging agent due to its ability to reduce lipofuscin accumulation in muscle cells.

Sarcopenia, the loss of muscle mass and strength that occurs with age, through creatine supplementation, has shown to slow down/prevent the onset. Sarcopenia affects up to 50% of adults over the age of 80 and is a major contributor to falls, disability, and frailty in the elderly. Creatine supplementation has been shown to increase muscle mass and strength in older adults, making it a potential treatment for sarcopenia.

In a meta-analysis published in the Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle, researchers reviewed randomized controlled trials that investigated the effects of creatine supplementation on muscle mass and strength in older adults. The researchers found that creatine supplementation during resistance training significantly increased muscle mass and strength in older adults. The researchers concluded that creatine supplementation may be a safe and effective treatment for sarcopenia in older adults.

Creatine may also have an anti-aging effect on the brain. Studies have shown that creatine supplementation can improve cognitive function in older adults and may be a potential treatment for age-related cognitive decline and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease.

In a study published in the Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, researchers investigated the effects of creatine supplementation on cognitive function in older adults. The researchers found that creatine supplementation improved cognitive performance in older adults, particularly in tasks that require short-term memory and processing speed. The researchers concluded that creatine may be a safe and effective treatment for age-related cognitive decline.

In a study published in the Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, researchers investigated the effects of creatine supplementation on muscle strength and fatigue in patients with multiple sclerosis. The researchers found that creatine supplementation significantly improved muscle strength and reduced fatigue in the patients. The researchers concluded that creatine supplementation may be a safe and effective treatment for multiple sclerosis-related fatigue and weakness.

In conclusion, creatine supplementation may have anti-aging effects on our bodies, particularly on lipofuscin accumulation and sarcopenia. It may also have cognitive benefits and improve exercise performance. However, as with any supplement, it is important to consult with a healthcare professional before starting creatine supplementation to ensure its safety and effectiveness for individual needs.

References:

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